Antiquated Fashions

A chronicle of fashion from vikings to the Victorian age, and beyond.

If you want to request anything, I'll do my best to find it. :)

BY COUNTRY:
[ America | France | Britain | Italy | Germany | Hungary | Russia | Europe ]

BY TYPE:
[ Extant | Illustration ]

BY CENTURY:
[ 12th Century | 16th Century | 18th Century | 19th Century | 20th Century ]
Merry Christmas!

Merry Christmas!

mimic-of-modes:

antiquatedfashions:

Evening Dress by Worth and Bobergh

France, 1869

Before Charles Worth had the wealth and prestige to open his famous House of Worth, his dressmaking ventures were funded by a man named Otto Bobergh, his partner in Worth and Bobergh.

This dress is an early example of Worth’s extant work, if late in the history of his partnership with Bobergh, but still shows the same meticulous care and attention to detail of his later dresses.

(Sorry, I’m going to put on my fussy face for a second.)

Worth & Bobergh pieces are very cool because of their scarcity. Extant piece of all stripes are cool! That’s why we look at them on Tumblr and Pinterest!

What is also really cool is linking back to the museum where your pictures of extant gowns come from. (This one comes from the Palais Galleria in Paris, GAL1928.5.1A-B-C-D-E.)

One reason for this is - why not? It is never that hard to indicate ownership. You don’t have to write out a complicated citation, or even give the accession number as I like to - this is the internet, you can just stick a link in there.

Here’s another good one. Photographs of dressed mannequins represent quite a lot of time investment. Someone (or a team of someones) had to pad out the form, put on the bustles and petticoats that have been made for the purpose, and then carefully dress it up like a giant doll. Let’s acknowledge the hours put into this by recognizing that someone’s workplace, at the very least.

(Not to mention, these pictures are technically under copyright, and I know that in fandom we’re not too big on IP/copyright issues, but museums are a bit more benevolent than Viacom and FOX, right? Give them some credit.)

And lastly, if you link back to the source, you’re making it possible for other people to dig up more pretties to show on Tumblr and Pinterest. Maybe someone else will go through the Palais Galleria site and find some other gem and introduce it to all of us.

Yes, it’s faster not to link. Yes, there’s the danger that people will care more about the site than your account when they can click through and see it. But museums deserve credit just as much as those of us who share their images, and you should link to them just as you (should) link to fanartists, and for the same reasons. I’m not saying everyone should be held to the same standards as scholars, but this is really the most basic level here.

Oh I know, I feel awful for lapsing in my acknowledging of museums in my posts (if you look back in my archive I have sourced quite a lot of what I’ve posted until recently, although links would still be preferable) but with the loss of my old computer, I’ve also lost a lot of my file organisation systems where I used to document source museums and collections. I don’t pull these images straight from the source websites and into my posts either, they were all collected almost 5 years ago, when I used to get bored during classes. Now all I have is a hodge podge of images with only dates and locations for a small part of my collection. Attempts to find the sources again have been rather dismal, reverse image searches tend to bring up page after page of tumblr and pinterest with no sign of the original pages, especially for some of the smaller museums and those with less well organised online databases.

That being said, I would love to be able to properly acknowledge the museums! I have a great amount of respect for the people who display, preserve and photograph these pieces. If you have any tips on how I might go about sourcing my collection once more, I would be more than happy to hear it, or if anyone helpful out there happens to know sources for things I am posting, feel free to let me know so I can amend my posts :)

Walking Ensemble by Charles Frederick Worth
France, 1889
I must admit, my 1885-1915 collection is a little bit swamped with House of Worth clothing and little else, but I can’t help myself!
This walking ensemble is complete with a châtelaine to be hung from the lady’s waist. The châtelaine was a form of functional jewellery that suspended several useful items from a hook at the waist, in the absence of pockets in most dresses and skirts.

Châtelaines were popular from the 17th to the early 20th century. The Englishwoman’s Domestic Magazine that reported on the fashions in 1874 held that châtelaines were worn at balls, having hooks suspended from them to hold fans. A spate of châtelaines in the 1878 Exhibition reflected their acceptance in formal wear. An extensive range of gold and silver, steel and electroplate fittings and appendages came on the market. Purses, étui memorandum books, pomanders, vinaigrettes, sewing implements and other nécessaire were suspended from them. Mass manufactured châtelaines became available, indicating the widespread use and popularity. The beginning of the 20th century marked the end of the chatelaine although modern day seamstresses still like to use them for practical reasons.

More on Châtelaines

Walking Ensemble by Charles Frederick Worth

France, 1889

I must admit, my 1885-1915 collection is a little bit swamped with House of Worth clothing and little else, but I can’t help myself!

This walking ensemble is complete with a châtelaine to be hung from the lady’s waist. The châtelaine was a form of functional jewellery that suspended several useful items from a hook at the waist, in the absence of pockets in most dresses and skirts.

Châtelaines were popular from the 17th to the early 20th century. The Englishwoman’s Domestic Magazine that reported on the fashions in 1874 held that châtelaines were worn at balls, having hooks suspended from them to hold fans. A spate of châtelaines in the 1878 Exhibition reflected their acceptance in formal wear. An extensive range of gold and silver, steel and electroplate fittings and appendages came on the market. Purses, étui memorandum books, pomanders, vinaigrettes, sewing implements and other nécessaire were suspended from them. Mass manufactured châtelaines became available, indicating the widespread use and popularity. The beginning of the 20th century marked the end of the chatelaine although modern day seamstresses still like to use them for practical reasons.

More on Châtelaines

Dress by Charles Frederick Worth
France, 1888

Dress by Charles Frederick Worth

France, 1888

wednesdayschildis:

antiquatedfashions:

Day Dress from Europe, 1857
The tartan pattern of this dress might suggest a Scottish origin, but the use of tartan in dressmaking was widespread during the Victorian era. Queen Victoria herself had a particular love for the romanticism of the Scottish Highlands, and under her influence, the use of tartan became widespread. She even designed her own pattern, the Victorian tartan, which is still used as a royal tartan!

So a dress that is vaguely from “Europe” must be Scottish since apparently the only kind of fabric pattern or design to come from Scotland was and is Tartan. Forget the Paisley shawls popular during the Regency era from you’ve guessed it Paisley in Scotland. The romanticism of Scotland that Victoria loved so much was a myth created by the upper class gentry and writers such a Walter Scott, A pure stereotype of the Bonnie Scotsman. “Clan Tartans” weren’t even seen before the 19th century. the word Tartan isn’t even Scottish, it comes from the French word Tiretain.  The entire descrition for the gorgeous dress annoys me beyond words.

Umm… did you read the description at all? I was pretty much debunking the common assumption that tartan clothing must come from Scotland by talking about the Victorian romanticism that had its roots firmly in England. I’ve even bolded for emphasis of the parts where I said almost exactly the same as you have here. I never even mentioned clan tartans (although I have gone into detail about paisleys in other posts before this one)
I don’t mind being corrected when I’m wrong about things, but it’s pretty rude to complain about my description when you clearly haven’t read/interpreted it properly at all.

wednesdayschildis:

antiquatedfashions:

Day Dress from Europe, 1857

The tartan pattern of this dress might suggest a Scottish origin, but the use of tartan in dressmaking was widespread during the Victorian era. Queen Victoria herself had a particular love for the romanticism of the Scottish Highlands, and under her influence, the use of tartan became widespread. She even designed her own pattern, the Victorian tartan, which is still used as a royal tartan!

So a dress that is vaguely from “Europe” must be Scottish since apparently the only kind of fabric pattern or design to come from Scotland was and is Tartan. Forget the Paisley shawls popular during the Regency era from you’ve guessed it Paisley in Scotland. The romanticism of Scotland that Victoria loved so much was a myth created by the upper class gentry and writers such a Walter Scott, A pure stereotype of the Bonnie Scotsman. “Clan Tartans” weren’t even seen before the 19th century. the word Tartan isn’t even Scottish, it comes from the French word Tiretain.  The entire descrition for the gorgeous dress annoys me beyond words.

Umm… did you read the description at all? I was pretty much debunking the common assumption that tartan clothing must come from Scotland by talking about the Victorian romanticism that had its roots firmly in England. I’ve even bolded for emphasis of the parts where I said almost exactly the same as you have here. I never even mentioned clan tartans (although I have gone into detail about paisleys in other posts before this one)

I don’t mind being corrected when I’m wrong about things, but it’s pretty rude to complain about my description when you clearly haven’t read/interpreted it properly at all.

Bustle Dress by White Howard & Co
America, 1887
Metropolitan Museum of Art
This dress, with its deep, blood red colour and chain motifs seems almost like something out of a vampire story, and I find myself incredibly curious about it. If anyone can dig up more information on this dress, I would love to hear it!

Bustle Dress by White Howard & Co

America, 1887

Metropolitan Museum of Art

This dress, with its deep, blood red colour and chain motifs seems almost like something out of a vampire story, and I find myself incredibly curious about it. If anyone can dig up more information on this dress, I would love to hear it!

Girl’s Dress in Silk and Velvet from France, 1886

Girl’s Dress in Silk and Velvet from France, 1886

Evening Dress by R.H. White & Company

1885, America

This pale blue and cream dress is of an incredibly interesting design, with the fur trim along the neckline and hem of the long, pleated train. It also shows the beautifully fitted bodices and tiny, corseted waists that were admirable in the 1880s.

Evening Dress from America, 1884-1886 (for 1884)

One of my favourite ever bustle dresses. The tailoring and design of this dress is just perfect!

Evening Dress from America, 1884-1886 (for 1884)

One of my favourite ever bustle dresses. The tailoring and design of this dress is just perfect!

Misses’ Polonaise Costume, from Butterick's Delineator 
America, September 1883.

Misses’ Polonaise Costume, from Butterick's Delineator

America, September 1883.